Intro:

The introduction of digital photography represents the single most significant development in photographic technology in recent decades.  By the turn of the 21st century digital equipment, imaging, and output were rapidly displacing traditional analogue cameras, chemical film, and light sensitive photo papers; these older materials faced obsolescence, as the computer and printer replace the darkroom.

Artists engage with digital technologies in different ways. Some scan photographic negatives, digitizing the image into data that can be manipulated via software and printed out via inkjet printers. Others create images directly with digital cameras that automatically create a raw data file. In both cases, the resulting images can be easily altered using programs like Photoshop. The photographic print made from a digital image file can also take on different characteristics depending on the inks and support selected. This technology also allows for prints to expand to very large sizes.

Sara Krajewski

 

(Ori Gersht: Concrete City Scans: Rotation No. 2 [from Concrete City series, no. 2])

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Ori Gersht (England, b. Israel, 1967)

Concrete City Scans: Rotation No. 2 [from Concrete City series, no. 2]. 2003

Chromogenic color print mounted to acrylic

47 5/16 x 58 1/4 in. image size

Henry Art Gallery, gift of Burt and Jane Berman, 2006.38

(Isaac Layman: Tools)

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Isaac Layman (U.S., b. 1977)

Tools. 2008

Pigmented inkjet print

53 5/16 x 71 1/4 in. visible image size

Henry Art Gallery, purchased with funds from Joseph and Elaine Monsen, 2008.179

Isaac Layman makes photographs with a high-resolution digital 4 x 5 camera, often stitching together multiple images and perspectives in a single image. Layman also photographs from the same viewpoint many times, focusing the camera at different depths, bringing multiple areas into focus in order to heighten or confuse the sense of space inside a given scene. While the high resolution and accurate focus adds to a sense of space and realism, the photographs ultimately fail (as photography always does) at being the “real” thing.

Excerpted from: http://www.lawrimoreproject.com/lp/Artists/Pages/Isaac_Layman.html

(Amir Zaki: Untitled (Winter Pool 32) [from the Spring Through Winter series])

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Amir Zaki (U.S., b. 1974)

Untitled (Winter Pool 32) [from the Spring Through Winter series]. 2004

Ultrachrome archival digital print

55 x 43 in. visible image size

Henry Art Gallery, Henry Contemporaries Acquisition Fund purchase, 2005.102

(Ori Gersht: Snake Road [from the Apocalyptic Landscape series])

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Ori Gersht (England, b. Israel, 1967)

Snake Road [from the Apocalyptic Landscape series]. 2003

Chromogenic color print mounted to aluminum

48 x 60 in. image size

Henry Art Gallery, gift of Burt and Jane Berman, 2007.25

(Chris Engman: Transplant)

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Chris Engman (U.S., b. 1978)

Transplant. 2005

Archival inkjet print

48 x 36 in. image size

Henry Art Gallery, purchased with funds from Joseph and Elaine Monsen, 2006.25

The artist writes, “this tree was photographed in western Washington in winter, reproduced as a large photograph, and transplanted to a place in eastern Washington where only shrubs and cheat grass grow.”

Source: http://www.gregkucera.com/engman.htm

(Roy McMakin: Untitled)

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Roy McMakin (U.S., b. 1956)

Untitled. 2004

Digital diamond print mounted on foam core

22 x 60 in. overall

Henry Art Gallery, Museum purchase, 2004.196